Is ventricular septal defect compatible with life?

Ventricular septal defect Small VSDs are usually asymptomatic and compatible with a normal life (in fact, about 40% close spontaneously in early childhood). Large VSDs cause cardiac failure in the second or third month after birth.

What problems can ventricular septal defect lead to?

Over time, if not repaired, this defect can increase the risk for other complications, including heart failure, high blood pressure in the lungs (called pulmonary hypertension), irregular heart rhythms (called arrhythmia), or stroke.

Is ventricular septal defect a cause of death?

Ventricular septal defects (VSD) are usually considered non-life-threatening, usually closing spontaneously or causing symptoms of congestive heart failure, which can be surgically treated in time to save the patient’s life.

Can you live a long life with CHD?

As medical care and treatment have improved, babies and children with congenital heart defects (CHDs) are living longer and healthier lives. Most are now living into adulthood. Ongoing, appropriate medical care can help children and adults with a CHD live as healthy as possible.

What are the long term effects of VSD?

Without treatment, heart failure can develop. Pulmonary hypertension. Increased blood flow to the lungs due to the VSD causes high blood pressure in the lung arteries (pulmonary hypertension), which can permanently damage them. This complication can cause reversal of blood flow through the hole (Eisenmenger syndrome).

What is the long term treatment for ventricular septal defect?

Most people whose VSDs were repaired in childhood don’t have any long-term heart problems. However, some may require continuous treatment with diuretics and blood pressure medications to help the heart pump better.

Is a VSD considered heart disease?

A ventricular septal defect (VSD) is a heart malformation present at birth. Any condition that is present at birth can also be termed a “congenital” condition. A VSD, therefore, is a type of congenital heart disease (CHD).

What is the normal size of VSD?

The VSDs were classified as: small (diameter less than or equal to 3 mm), medium (3 to 6 mm) and large (greater than 6 mm). Twelve children were lost to follow-up; the remainder were followed up for an average of 35 months. The VSDs were muscular (39%), membranous (37%), infundibular (2%) or unlocalised (22%).

What is the life expectancy of someone with angina?

Our patients with stable angina pectoris, who had a median duration of angina of two years and a mean age of 59 years at baseline, had a good prognosis. Thus, the total mortality was 1.7% a year and CV mortality was 1% a year during nine years of follow up.

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